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TADHD: A Path to Success: A Revolutionary Theory and New Innovation in Drug-Free Therapy

 

TADHD: A Path to Success: A Revolutionary Theory and New Innovation in Drug-Free Therapy
by Lawrence Weathers

May,2000 treatment follow-up study shows that 92% of families rate treatment as Successful or Very Successful. See "Publisher's Comments" section below for more details.

Most books on adhd rehash the same worn out theories and treatments. Instead, ADHD: A Path to Success offers a new perspective on ADHD that makes sense with your own personal experience. - it is not a deficit, defect or neurological disorder.

- it is a highly refined, short-term coping skill that backfires.

- takes it out of the realm of medical mystery and psychobabble.

- describes a new, no drug, no diet, no nonsense, patented treatment technology.

You can only help your child when you understand their experience through their eyes. The engaging story of Dr. Weathers personal struggle and conquest of attention deficit disorder is chronicled. He explains your child's experience of attention deficit disorder as they live it, rather than how adults think about it. Once you understand attention deficit disorder from your child's point of view, you have taken an essential step to helping him solve his problem. Instead of just seeing attention deficit disorder as a problem you will learn how it "works" for your child. It makes his life easier on the moment to moment basis, even though it causes problems in the long run. With this new perspective you can look at your child's behavior in a more positive light and react in a more helpful manner. It is easy reading designed for parents as well as professionals. Many case studies and concrete examples of effective strategies are provided.

From the Publisher
ADHD Treatment Follow-Up Study: May, 2000

Even though, after treating ADHD children and their families for years it was clear that CAER treatment was very effective; it was finally time to do a systematic quantitative follow-up study. The results strongly support my clinical impression that CAER makes dramatic improvements in all aspects of the constellation of symptoms comprising ADHD/ADD, without the use of medications. It should be noted that these are some of the most difficult ADHD children around. Parents don't spend the time and money to fly to Spokane until they have exhausted all closer and cheaper alternatives.

Over the last 2 years (98, 99) I saw 74 children, and their families, who could be clearly diagnosed as ADHD/ADD. Their ages ranged from 6 to 17 years. Seventy six percent were males the balance females. Ninety six percent had previously been treated with psychotropic medications, such as Ritalin, Cylert, Adderall, Dexedrine, Chlonadine, Paxil, etc.

We were able to contact 49 parents by telephone to administer a short questionnaire about the effects of CAER treatment on their ADHD/ADD child. To avoid a short-term placebo or honey-moon-effect, only families 6 months or more post-treatment were contacted. All families were treated with three multi-hour intensive treatment sessions over three days.

Overall results were:

86% rated it as Very Effective 6% rated it as Effective 8% rated it as No Different None rated it as harmful.

None of the children in the Very Effective or Effective categories had been placed on psychotropic medications. Of the children rated No difference, 58% in that category had been placed on psychotropic medications, with mixed effectiveness.

Behavior Change At Home:

81% rated their child's behavior as Much Better 11% rated their child's behavior as Better 8% rated their child's behavior as No Different None rated it as harmful

Behavior Change At School:

76% rated their child's behavior as Much Better 13% rated their child's behavior as Better 11% rated their child's behavior as No Different None rated it as harmful

Change in Grades:

74% rated their child's grades as Much Better 15% rated their child's grades as Better 11% rated their child's grades as No Different None felt that their child's grades were worse as a result of treatment




From the Back Cover
A revolutionary theory that lets you: See through your ADHD child's eyes. Discover how we all sometimes think like ADHD children. Learn how your child's ADHD is not a deficit, but a highly refined skill that helps him survive.

A new, patented therapy that: Can help your child be the success he was meant to be. Addresses the core of your child's ADHD, rather than just controlling it. Can alleviate ADHD without drugs

What does this mean to you? Well, this is what others say:

" Dr Weathers and CAER gave me my son back, after we had tried every thing else." Mother of 9 year old ADHD boy.

Not another 'me too' ADHD book. It provided me with a new and more useful perspective on ADHD children. This book will revive your faith in your ADHD child's future. Joseph McManus, M.D. Pediatrician, Spokane WA.

"An entirely new perspective on ADHD and an entirely different approach, which I find very encouraging, readable, useful and humorous. It is the first book on ADHD that I am eager to recommend to my colleagues and parents.." Rosanna Hoit, MA, School Counselor, Tampa FL

"Clear, interesting and informative... Gave me a new and more useful perspective on ADHD." Janice McFarland, elementary school teacher, Spokane WA



About the Author
The author is an ADHD kid made good. He earned a Ph.D. in child clinical psychology from Peabody College of Vanderbilt University in 1974. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Psychotherapy. Before moving to Spokane in 1978, he was Director of the Adolescent Unit at Central state Psychiatric Hospital in Nashville TN, Director of the Family and Children's Achievement Center in Miami FL, Director of the Adolescent Unit at the Florida Mental Health Institute, and later Professor and Director of Research and Evaluation at the Florida Mental Health Institute at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida.

Though he has numerous professional publications, this is his first offering to the popular press. His background straddles psychology and engineering. In the late 60's he was a system's engineer for IBM. Later he founded a company to develop software to score and interpret major personality and intelligence tests (MMPI & WISC/WAIS). In the late 80's these software packages were sold worldwide.

His affection for technology goes back to his pre-teen days when he developed his first working fuel injection system that successfully ran on his father's pickup truck. As a teen, he put big engines in little cars (hot rods). After becoming a psychologist, he developed an electronic prompting device to speed psychotherapy and psychotherapeutic board games to structure inexpensive group therapy to treat large numbers of people inexpensively.

Since leaving the academic world, Dr. Weathers has worked in private practice with his psychologist wife, Mary. He has been working with children and families for more than 25 years. He and Mary chose Spokane because of their interests in back packing, hiking, mountaineering, telemark skiing, and bicycling.



Excerpted from AHDH: A Path to Success by Weathers, Lawrence R.. Copyright . Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved
Chris was a cute, freckle-faced, six-year-old boy who embodied my image of Tom Sawyer. Only in the first grade, Chris was already falling behind in his schoolwork. His teacher described him as constantly disrupting the class by speaking out of turn, touching other children, being out of his seat, and playing with toys rather than doing his work. Chris' mother brought this young "Tom Sawyer" to me for an evaluation for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This was at the school's insistence. The teacher was resolute in her belief that Chris had ADHD and must be put on stimulant medication. Since Chris' mother strongly objected to this recommendation, she instead brought Chris to me, a psychologist with a new, drug-free, alternative treatment. After only three sessions using Computer Aided Emotional Restructuring (CAER), Chris' behavior at school and home improved markedly. Three years after his initial visit, follow-up evaluations have revealed no further academic or behavior problems. Chris is still doing well at home and school. Computer Aided Emotional Restructuring is a treatment technology that extinguishes ineffective emotional patterns quickly, effectively, and without drugs. Unpleasant memories and emotions are at the root of physiological and psychological problems. CAER "restructures" or extinguishes these negative emotions so they no longer get in the way of optimal functioning. With Chris, I asked him to think about people who made him mad. This included his teacher, some of his fellow students at school, some boys at day care who would not let him play, and his big brother. Chris liked doing this. He said it made him "think about things." At the end of session one Chris' mother was given a five-minute cassette tape and instruction sheet to take to the teacher. The teacher was asked to record her "behavioral control instructions" such as "Put that in your desk," "Keep your hands to yourself," and "Sit on your bottom." During sessions two and three using CAER, this tape was played. He reported that this tape made him mad. He also said that after he had listened to the tape a few times, it did not make him angry any longer. With the help of CAER, ADHD can be overcome.

We Think Like ADHD Children All the Time In my view ADHD is not a deficit at all, but a highly refined skill. Let me illustrate by citing a personal experience. While engaged in the relentless drudgery of writing the computer program logic and voice prompts for CAER, I was having trouble concentrating. My attention constantly drifted off after I wrote each sentence. I continually caught myself looking out the window, going to the bathroom, making a telephone call, or looking at a magazine. With great effort, I brought myself back to the tedious, repetitive task at hand -- writing another sentence. A large cup of espresso coffee helped increase my willful control over my attention. With the coffee, I temporarily regained the power to make my mind do the required task for a little longer. Finally, after hours of this struggle, I logged onto the Internet. In just a few seconds, my attention and energy improved dramatically, though I had not changed my position at the very same computer, the very same desk, next to the very same window. My attention went unbroken for the next hour as I searched the Internet for things that interested me. Thinking back over this scenario, I see my experience exactly parallels that of the ADHD child. I was forcing myself to do a dreaded task, much as a teacher forces a child to do his work in the classroom. My writing the computer system was very similar to the ADHD child doing math or spelling. Both of our tasks required continuous, sequential attention to detail. Both were repetitive of a similar process with detailed variations. Both were boring because of the repetition, and both of us were required to do the task to achieve a goal. Though I could keep my body at the task just as the teacher keeps the child at his desk, the unpleasantness of both our tasks soon conditioned our attention to switch to more interesting things. For the child it might be staring out the window, playing with an eraser, or wandering around the classroom. We both achieved relief from these boring tasks by automatically, against my conscious intention or the teacher's will, learning to avoid the aversive tasks by shifting our attention away from them -- "spacing out" or becoming distracted. Relative to the tasks assigned to us, we each had an "attention" deficit and were being "hyperactive."

In fact, my cup of espresso worked just like the child's dose of Ritalin (Dexedrine or Cylert). Both Ritalin and caffeine are powerful central nervous system stimulants and help us redirect our attention back to the task we intentionally wish to address. My time on the Internet also worked like a child's time on Nintendo. As many parents know, ADHD children can attend to Nintendo for hours, even though they may have been very distracted from the school work that immediately preceded it. My ability to focus my attention rebounded in exactly the same way when I logged on to the Internet. The Internet and Nintendo share a common feature in that they have no negative history that make a person want to "space out" instead of doing the needed work. At our chosen tasks our attention was flawless. It would seem to take a very peculiar neurological deficit to account for such sudden variation in both of our attentional patterns.

Do I have ADHD? I doubt it as much as I doubt that most kids labeled as such have ADHD, at least as it is normally conceptualized as a neurological disorder. We have to give up the idea that the ADHD child's mental processes are strange, unusual, defective or inferior. They are just one more variation of the perceptual distortion that all of us use everyday to survive in an often-crazy world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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